Dry Eye Syndrome

Watery eyes, particularly in windy, sunny or dry conditions, can be caused by dry eye syndrome, which can also be triggered by many medical conditions and taking certain medications.

Gareth Thomas, Head of Sales and Marketing at Altacor, says: “Lubrication of the eye is very sophisticated. The eye is bathed in a film of tears every time you blink. This film has a watery inside contained by an oily outside layer to reduce evaporation, and a lubricant on the innermost layer nearest the eye ball. These delicate layers can easily be disrupted by medication, including the contraceptive pill.”

The characteristic dry eye symptoms include scratchy or itchy feeling eyes that look red rimmed. However, the eye can also over compensate resulting in watery eyes. This makes the condition difficult to recognise despite being very easy to treat.

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Clinitas dry eye drops help protect golfers from extremes

Eye care is particularly important for golfers, who are exposed not just to glare and UV light but also to dust, pollen and wind – all of which can irritate the eyes.  Many golfers suffer from watery eyes and are unaware that it may be a symptom of dry eye, which can also cause a scratchy, gritty or smarting feeling and can be easily relieved with eye drops. Continue reading

Dry eye gel offers overnight relief

A dry eye gel can be helpful in relieving discomfort triggered by dry, dusty or windy environments or dry eye caused by medication such as HRT, anti-histamines.

Clinitas Hydrate is a liquid gel that spreads rapidly over the cornea to relieve friction and provide lubrication.  It works by boosting the aqueous layer of the tear film. In addition to releasing water it also contains carbomer 980 which means the eye drops stay longer in the eye to provide lasting relief.

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Is your medication causing dry eye?

Dry eye is a term used for a variety of tear film disorders that result in the inadequate wetting of the eye.

The characteristic symptom of ‘dry eye’ is scratchy or itchy feeling eyes that look red rimmed. However, some tear film disorders can actually result in watery eyes because the eye tries to compensate for the damage caused to it’s surface layer.

Hormones stimulate the production of tears and so hormonal changes associated with the menopause can be a risk factor for dry eye. As we age, we also produce fewer tears, which may explain why dry-eye is particularly common amongst older women.

Several medicines are associated with dry eye including antihistamines, antidepressants and some drugs used to treat high blood pressure. Using Clinitas eye-drops alongside these treatments can therefore be of great benefit. Other risk factors for dry-eye include recent laser surgery and medical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus.

Some nurses have reported that dry eye is one of the side-effects that patients often find sufficiently distressing to stop taking their medication.  Clinitas is also available on prescription so if you are on medication and experiencing dry eye it would be worth discussing this with your GP.

Diabetes and dry eye care

People with diabetes are more prone to dry eyes. If your eyes feel tired, sore or gritty or sandy, you may have ‘dry eyes’, or ‘blepharitis’, or both.

The eyelids have tiny glands in them, especially the lower lids. These glands make substances that mix with tears, and help the tears to spread across the eye. This thin layer of tears lubricates the eyes, stops them drying out, and keeps them comfortable. However, as you get older, and particularly if you have dry skin, these glands can block. As a result the glands do not make the chemicals that enables the tears to  spread evenly across the front of the eye. The tears break up and dry patches develop on the surface of the eye which makes them feel sore.

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Not a dry eye in the house

Cambridge News journalist Mike Scialom had suffered for years from dry eye brought on, in part, by air conditioning and too much time at the computer screen. This gave him a special interest in talking to Gareth Thomas, Sales and Marketing Manager of Altacor about the science behind Clinitas and he was keen to test it out.

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New-look Clinitas Hydrate is refreshing sight for dry eyes

Clinitas Hydrate®, a high-performance liquid gel drop is set to hit UK stores with new packaging and a promise to bring rapid long-lasting relief from the discomfort of irritable dry eyes by boosting the tear film to keep eyes moist.

Formulated for everyday use, the liquid gel spreads rapidly on contact to quickly coat the whole eye surface, giving fast relief from symptoms. Safe, non-toxic and easy to apply, it is particularly effective for use overnight or first thing in the morning. Usually one drop is applied three to five times a day into the eye.

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